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Religious Persecutions, Courage & Virginity


Victim Numbers in the Persecutions in India
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TIA,

Please alert your readers and ask for their prayers. The religious war continues in India.

In fact, a few hours after the canonization of the first Indian saint, Sister Alphonsa, a church has been burned, the Church of St. Anthony in Yedavanahalli, near Bangalore (Madya Pradesh). In recent weeks, other churches have been targeted in the state, following the campaign of violence launched by radical Hindus at the end of August, starting from the district of Kandhamal in Orissa.

The list of victims in the attack continues to rise: 61 dead, 18,000 wounded; 181 churches razed or destroyed; 4,500 homes belonging to Christians burned; more than 50,000 displaced, of whom more than 30,000 have disappeared into the forests.

     E.L.
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Becoming Discouraged
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Dear TIA,

Quid faciamus? [What should we do?]

Forgive the doom and gloom that I have to bring. However, it seems that everything is drawing toward a grim future. Do I need to mention the specifics in the wrecked post-Vatican II, grossly immoral, and financially depressing world which you have already mentioned?

What can I do to survive these times spiritually? Will Our Lady's Immaculate Heart triumph without a consecration of Russia?

Please have pity and give advice and aid a sad soul.

     M.A.N., loyal supporter of TIA


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TIA responds:

Dear M.A.N.,

We completely agree with you that the present times are sad and painful. This is not a reason, however, to lose confidence in Our Lady. As far as we know, the consecration of Russia was asked to prevent the chastisement. If it had been made, we would have had the Reign of Mary without it. Since it was not done, the chastisement became inevitable; nonetheless, the Triumph of Our Lady will also come, as she promised.

The Reign of Mary will come to fulfill the plan of God in History, a necessity for His own glory. If a new and most Catholic era were not to come, we would not have the fulfillment of the promise of Our Lord - only one Shepherd and one flock in the world - and mankind would not give the glory to God it is supposed to give. Now then, since God is omniscient, He would not have created the world unless that full measure of glory were to be given to Him. Therefore, the Reign of Mary has to come.

Even if there had been no Fatima, this reasoning would hold true. But we had the apparitions of Fatima where Our Lady confirmed the fact of a triumph.

So, there are many reasons to remain confident. Have courage and face these sad times in a manly way. Try to fight the enemy more - rather than just lament the times.

This is the advice we wholeheartedly offer you.

Thank you for your support.

     Cordially,

    TIA correspondence desk

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Unwed Mothers & Virginity
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Dear Fr. Sretenovic,

May I say how much I agree with your comments on the "unmarried mother" and your restatement of the traditional teaching of the Church on this issue.

The unmarried woman with child, represents a threat to the moral fiber of our society. The fact that she is no longer punished by society is confirmation to any young girl that she may misbehave with complete impunity. There is also a grave danger to the morals of the child of such a woman.

I believe the traditional Catholic system, whereby such a woman was consigned to the care of the nuns for penance and moral retraining was a good one and in the best interests of the woman. The child was given to the care of the Church also and was, therefore, reared according to good Catholic principles. I would like to see a return of this system and I welcome the fact you say it is being brought back in some countries.

A black and white photograph of a Magdalene Laundry

Order and serenity in this Magdalene house in Strasbourg
[Before Vatican II,] the Magdalene asylums were a deterrent to us all as we grew up. I taught girls in an industrial school, some of whom were the illegitimate daughters of such women. Their mothers were housed on the same site in a Magdalene Institution. As a member of the Legion of Mary at the time, we were responsible for sending women to the good Sisters. I visited the laundry on a number of occasions and witnessed the good order and air of penitence which prevailed. Hard work, strict silence and constant prayer were the order of the day. The girls and women learned true obedience and respect for authority. They also learned the virtue of humility. ...

There is no doubt many conversions were obtained by these methods and many of these women became life long penitents and stayed within the convent walls for the whole of their life.

Others, who were allowed to leave, held down good positions in domestic work and, indeed, some even became housekeepers for priests. In my experience, very few of these women remained recalcitrant, and thus many souls were saved from damnation.

Sadly, today we have lost our sense of the awfulness of the loss of virginity in a young unmarried woman. In my young days it was truly a disaster and a source of great shame. As you point out so well, Reverend Father such sins cry out for punishment. This of course does not mean that the woman must never be forgiven. All sin can be forgiven under certain circumstances and in certain conditions. However in the case of grave sin - and pregnancy outside marriage is a grave sin - such a sinner should never be allowed to fully integrate again with decent society. It would be a grave disservice to the many good Catholic and pious mothers to allow such a woman to be treated as their equal.

The "Magdalene System" has of course been vilified by our "liberal mafia" but it had much to recommend it. Women who commit such grave sins against the moral order often feel a need for cleansing through penance. Modern society does not allow them this opportunity. Instead, we reward such gross misbehavior with welfare payments and a benign attitude.

With best wishes Father and gratitude for your instructions on this point.

     C.M., Ireland
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An Unknown Gregory XVII?
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I know you're aware that the short article you put on TIA about sede-vacantism is just one person's opinion.

I just wanted say something in this regard.

For a short time, I ascribed to this "theory." I have come to the conclusion, in conscience, and after much research, that it is impossible for the line of succession to be broken. Apostolic Bulls and decrees, and other documents out of Church history agree with this stance.

On the surface, it seems like I am saying that Ratzinger is pope, and this is not the case.

In 1958, something unprecedented happened. White smoke billowed from the smokestack in the Vatican in front of hundreds of thousands of Catholic onlookers. But who else was there? Freemasons and those of the B'nai B'rith not only were there, but they had interfered during the Conclave, as was reported by a relative of two of the Swiss Guard. A pope was elected when the white smoke was seen, and it was not the man who came out a half an hour later. It was a different man, who was imprisoned in his own episcopal palace. Evidence of this is the security cameras all over his residence before they were "cool;" pre-1989, when he died mysteriously.

Who is this man? He was a man who did not deny he was the pope. He was a man who said "We will not be bound by these decrees." He was the man who endured martyrdom for 35 years. Pope Gregory XVII.

Where's the proof that this is true? Declassified Department of State documents confirm it. In "The Confidential Biography of John XXIII" the proof exists. I am trying to get a copy of it myself.

According to the Church, if a pope accepts the position after being elected in the conclave, he cannot abjure it under duress, which is what I believe happened here. He did not lose his office. He endured a horrendous martyrdom. What else does the Church say? We cannot judge a pope, so if he were, indeed, the pope - and documents seem to contain proof of this - then it seems that we do not know entirely the pain and agony that Gregory XVII went through in his exile.

But wait... if this is true, and he died in 1989, what happened to the perpetual line of succession? Well, that's a good question too. It would seem that perhaps a year or two before Gregory XVII's death, he appointed Cardinals in pectore. But wait again ... doesn't a pope have to reveal the cardinals he appointed "in pectore" before he dies? There is a precedent here. Behind the Iron Curtain, popes did not reveal the names of the Cardinals they appointed in pectore, but that didn't remove their authority as Cardinals then. Wouldn't it make sense that being in imminent, real, physical danger, that he would appoint these Cardinals for the safety of the line of succession? It sure does to me.

Does this seem to be too much? Well, in 1958, Sister Lucy warned, "Soon, 1960 will be here." Our Lady of LaSalette warned also, "The Church will be in Eclipse." And the late Malachi Martin, "Unless you believe that there is a wholesale apostasy in the clergy and the laity of the institutional Roman Catholic Church, the Third Secret won't make any sense." And that's not all, Malachi Martin - or so I understand - had tremendous doubts about John XXIII-John Paul II being popes at all, and he, too, died under mysterious circumstances. The new book he was putting out was going to be called, Primacy: How the Institutionalized Roman Catholic Church became a Creature of the New World Order.

Our Lady said that there would be a time when our only refuge would be the Scapular and the Rosary. I truly believe if those times are not upon us now, they are going to be here extremely soon with the deaths of many older, validly ordained priests. Our Lady also said, that you would walk a thousand miles and not find a priest.

These times are at hand. Personally, what must I do, believing that we have a true pope in exile somewhere? The only thing Our Lady said we would be able to do in these times: Pray the Rosary and wear your Scapular. Jacinta said, "I see the Holy Father in a very large house, on his knees before a table, with his hands over his face, crying. In front of his house, there are many people, and some are throwing stones at him, others are cursing him and saying very foul words to him. Poor little Holy Father! We must pray a lot for Him!"

Was Jacinta talking about Gregory XVII? Was she talking about the current pope in exile? The Freemasons have done a very good job of making most of us oblivious to what their doings are, and I can only hope and pray that all of us will come to the realization of the truth, and pray for the true pope that is somewhere in hiding, making sure that the line is maintained, despite the evil that resides in the Vatican.

     L.M.
Posted October 16, 2008

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The opinions expressed in this section - What People Are Commenting -
do not necessarily express those of TIA


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Related Topics of Interest


burbtn.gif - 43 Bytes   The Fruits of Ecumenism in India

burbtn.gif - 43 Bytes   The Grace of Contrition and the Reign of Mary

burbtn.gif - 43 Bytes   The Fidelity of the Remnant through History

burbtn.gif - 43 Bytes   Divorced Parents, Unwed Mothers

burbtn.gif - 43 Bytes   Unwed Mothers: the Catholic and Calvinist Answers

burbtn.gif - 43 Bytes   Virginity Is a Higher than than Matrimony

burbtn.gif - 43 Bytes   Resistance vs. Sede-Vacantism


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