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Vices against Nature Are Also against God

What does the Angelic Doctor say about the sin of sodomy? St. Thomas Aquinas considers it unspeakable, because commiting the sin against nature causes a man to debase himself lower than even his animal nature.

This is the severe tone the Church Doctors always took with regard to such vice, until Vatican Council II and its tolerant views on Morals entered the picture.

St. Thomas Aquinas

"They (the sins against nature) are called passions of ignominy because they are not worthy of being named, according to that passage in Ephesians 5:12: ‘For the things that are done by them in secret, it is a shame even to speak of.’

"For if the sins of the flesh are commonly censurable because they lead man to that which is bestial in him, much more so is the sin against nature, by which man debases himself lower even than his animal nature" (Super Epistulas Sancti Pauli Ad Romanum I, 26, pp. 27-28).

In the Summa Theologiae, St. Thomas explains that when the order of nature is violated, an injury is done to God, the Author of nature, which makes the homosexual sin all the more grevious:

“Just as the order of right reason proceeds from man, so the order of nature is from God Himself: wherefore in sins contrary to nature, whereby the very order of nature is violated, an injury is done to God, the Author of nature.

"Hence Augustine says (Confess. 3, 8): 'Those foul offenses that are against nature should be everywhere and at all times detested and punished, such as were those of the people of Sodom, which should all nations commit, they should all stand guilty of the same crime, by the law of God which had not so made men so that they should abuse one another.

"'For even that very relationship that should exist between God and us is violated, when that same nature, of which He is the Author, is polluted by the perversity of lust.'" (II, II, q. 154, a. 12)

Apud Atila S. Guimaraes,
Vatican II, Homosexuality and Pedophilia, TIA, 2004, pp. 26-27
Posted August 15, 2015